PRESENTING SUPERB RESEARCH THAT ADVANCES THE FIELD OF EDUCATION

Womanish Black Girls

Women Resisting the Contradictions of Silence and Voice

Paperback
March 2019
9781975500917
More details
  • Publisher
    Myers Education Press
  • Published
    8th March
  • ISBN 9781975500917
  • Language English
  • Pages 200 pp.
  • Size 6" x 9"
  • Request Exam Copy
$42.95
Hardback
March 2019
9781975500900
More details
  • Publisher
    Myers Education Press
  • Published
    11th March
  • ISBN 9781975500900
  • Language English
  • Pages 200 pp.
  • Size 6" x 9"
  • Request Exam Copy
$149.95
Lib E-Book

Library E-Books

We have signed up with three aggregators who resell networkable e-book editions of our titles to academic libraries. These aggregators offer a variety of plans to libraries, such as simultaneous access by multiple library patrons, and access to portions of titles at a fraction of list price under what is commonly referred to as a “patron-driven demand” model.

These editions, priced at par with simultaneous hardcover editions of our titles, are not available direct from Stylus, but only from the following aggregators:

  • Ebook Library, a service of Ebooks Corporation Ltd. of Australia
  • ebrary, based in Palo Alto, a subsidiary of ProQuest
  • EBSCO / netLibrary, Alabama

as well as through the following wholesalers: The Yankee Book Peddler subsidiary of Baker & Taylor, Inc.

July 2019
9781975500924
More details
  • Publisher
    Myers Education Press
  • ISBN 9781975500924
  • Language English
  • Pages 200 pp.
  • Size 6" x 9"
$149.95
E-Book
July 2019
9781975500931
More details
$42.95

Womanish Black Girls/Women Resisting Contradictions of Silence and Voice is a collection of essays written by varied black women who fill spaces within the academy, public schools, civic organizations, and religious institutions. These writings are critically reflective and illuminate autobiographical storied-lives. A major theme is the notion of womanish black girls/women resisting the familial and communal expectations of being seen, rather than heard. Consequently, these memories and lived stories name contradictions between “being told what to do or say” and “knowing and deciding for herself.” Additional themes include womanism and feminism, male patriarchy, violence, cultural norms, positionality, spirituality, representation, survival, and schooling. While the aforementioned can revive painful images and feelings, the essays offer hope, joy, redemption, and the re-imagining of new ways of being in individual and communal spaces. An expectation is that middle school black girls, high school black girls, college/university black girls, and community black women will view this work as seedlings for understanding resistance, claiming voice, and healing.

Dianne Smith

Dianne Smith is Professor Emerita in Educational Leadership, Policy, and Foundations, School of Education, University of Missouri-Kansas City. Her work focuses on race/racism, womanist/feminist theory, critical educational theory, and curriculum theory. She has served as a visiting scholar at the University of Western Cape and Nelson Mandela University (formerly University of Port Elizabeth), both in South Africa. She is a past president of American Educational Studies Association. And, she has always imagined being beamed up by Scotty!

Loyce Caruthers

Loyce Caruthers is a Professor and Chair of Educational Leadership, Policy and Foundations at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, and has been with UMKC since 2001 where she teaches courses to prepare school administrators and qualitative research methods for doctoral students. Loyce also serves as the Coordinator of the Ed.D Education Administration Program. Loyce’s research involves the use of voice through narrative and critical race theory for exploring phenomena related to race, class, gender and other differences that may influence educators’ beliefs and perceptions, and ultimately their work in schools. Recent publications include a co-authored book, Great Expectations: What Kids Want from Our Urban Public Schools. She is engaged in a collaborative project, Kansas City Speaks: Stories of School Desegregation, a website to share stories of school desegregation through oral histories, artifacts, archival documents, and images made accessible to the public with a community yearbook feature and lesson plans for educators.

Shaunda Fowler

Shaunda Fowler was born and raised in Compton, California and spent a significant portion of her life with her maternal grandparents in the Imperial Courts Projects (PJs) in Watts. Growing up in the inner-city, she learned that being womanish was a way of survival. It is her hope that girls/women of color will be brave enough to have courageous conversations about being womanish in order to heal old wounds and find joy. Dr. Fowler is a middle school principal in a small mid-western school district where many of the girls of color can be considered womanish.