NRCFYE - Teaching & Learning

Teaching & Learning

Assessing the First-Year Seminar
Friedman, a recognized expert on seminar administration and assessment, provides a comprehensive framework for deciding what to assess, what kinds of data to collect and from whom, and how to use findings for continuous program refinement and improvement. The volume is a useful tool for administrators launching a new seminar or managing a decades old course. While centered on the first-year seminar, Friedman’s suggested strategies can be applied to a wide range of educational experiences in the first college year and beyond.

Other volumes in the series:
Volume I: Designing and Administering the Course
Volume II: Instructor Training and Development
Volume III: Teaching in the First-Year Seminar
Volume IV: Using Peers in the Classroom

These are also available as a Five Volume Set

Paper: 978 1 889271 81 1 / $25.00
Designing and Administering the Course
The volume opens by defining common seminar configurations, goals, and course topics, drawing on national studies and institutional research reports. It also offers guidance in selecting a seminar model. The authors also address strategies for launching and administering the seminar and successfully managing change within the course. Broadly conceived, this first volume in the five-volume series lays the ground work for more in-depth coverage to follow.

Other volumes in the series:
Volume II: Instructor Training and Development
Volume III: Teaching in the First-Year Seminar
Volume IV: Using Peers in the Classroom
Volume V: Assessing the First-Year Seminar

These are also available as a Five Volume Set

Paper: 978 1 889271 75 0 / $25.00
Instructor Training and Development
Guided by an understanding of adult development, the authors suggest strategies for designing and presenting a comprehensive faculty development program in support of the first-year seminar. Chapters focus on the organization of one-shot and ongoing development efforts, content for training programs, evaluation as a development activity, and strategies for recruiting and maintaining a dedicated instructor team. While focused on the first-year seminar, the volume offers useful insight for anyone charged with designing faculty development initiatives for first-year instructors.

Other volumes in the series:
Volume I: Designing and Administering the Course
Volume III: Teaching in the First-Year Seminar
Volume IV: Using Peers in the Classroom
Volume V: Assessing the First-Year Seminar

These are also available as a Five Volume Set

Paper: 978 1 889271 76 7 / $25.00
Paths to Learning
Teaching for Engagement in College
Higher education institutions are more diverse than ever before, as are the students they serve. Because of this great diversity, there is no silver bullet—one approach—that will work for teaching all students in all circumstances. This book offers a succinct description of several pedagogical paths available to faculty that can actively engage all students. In addition to providing the most recent information on learning and assessment, individual chapters tackle different approaches, including critical pedagogy, contemplative pedagogy, strengths-based teaching, and cooperative/collaborative learning. While the discussion is grounded in theory, authors present examples of applying these approaches in physical and virtual learning environments. Paths to Learning is a valuable overview of engaging pedagogies for educators seeking to sharpen their teaching skills, which in turn, will help students become more confident and successful learners.

Paper: 978 1 889271 92 7 / $30.00
Teaching in the First-Year Seminar
Building on the conversation begun in Volume II on instructor training and development, Garner delves deeper into the concepts and strategies undergirding effective educational practice. Highly practical in nature, yet grounded in educational theory and research, Volume III offers a concise guide to teaching in the first-year seminar from organizing a syllabus, structuring individual class sessions, and engaging students in the classroom to conducting meaningful assessments of their learning. Because Garner focuses on the learning process rather than specific content, the strategies are highly portable to a range of seminar types and undergraduate courses. An invaluable resource for college instructors looking to improve their own teaching.

Other volumes in the series:
Volume I: Designing and Administering the Course
Volume II: Instructor Training and Development
Volume IV: Using Peers in the Classroom
Volume V: Assessing the First-Year Seminar

These are also available as a Five Volume Set

Paper: 978 1 889271 77 4 / $25.00
What Makes the First-Year Seminar High Impact?
Exploring Effective Educational Practices
Edited by Tracy L. Skipper
First-year seminars have been widely hailed as a high-impact educational practice, leading to improved academic performance, increased retention, and achievement of critical 21st Century learning outcomes. While the first-year seminar tends to be narrowly defined in the literature, national explorations of course structure and administration underscore the diversity of these curricular initiatives across and within individual campuses. What then are the common denominators among these highly variable courses that contribute to their educational effectiveness?

This collection of case studies--representing a wide variety of institutional and seminar types--addresses this question. Using Kuh and O’Donnell’s eight conditions of effective educational initiatives as a framework, authors describe the structure, pedagogy, and assessment strategies that lead to high-quality seminars. Introductory and concluding essays examine the structural conditions that are likely to support educational effectiveness in the seminar and describe the most commonly reported conditions across all cases. What Makes the First-Year Seminar High Impact? offers abundant models for ensuring the delivery of a high-quality educational experience to entering students.

Paper: 978 1 9420 7201 0 / $25.00
Writing in the Senior Capstone
Theory & Practice
Surveys of employers continually highlight the need for better communication skills among recent college graduates. Yet writing instruction in higher education serves far more than a transactional purpose. Writing facilitates learning, helps students gain skills in analysis and synthesis, and supports a range of other personal and intellectual developmental outcomes also important to employers. To that end, Writing in the Senior Capstone offers the rationale and practical guidance for infusing writing into culminating academic experiences for college seniors. Recognizing that writing-intensive capstones already exist on many campuses, the authors also offer a range of strategies and activities to support the development of independent senior projects, while honing students’ thinking, writing, and presentation skills. A valuable resource for any educator seeking to improve the writing and critical thinking skills of college seniors.

Paper: 978 1 889271 87 3 / $30.00