NRCFYE - The First-Year Seminar: Designing, Implementing, and Assessing Courses to Support Student Learning and Success

The First-Year Seminar: Designing, Implementing, and Assessing Courses to Support Student Learning and Success

Assessing the First-Year Seminar
Friedman, a recognized expert on seminar administration and assessment, provides a comprehensive framework for deciding what to assess, what kinds of data to collect and from whom, and how to use findings for continuous program refinement and improvement. The volume is a useful tool for administrators launching a new seminar or managing a decades old course. While centered on the first-year seminar, Friedman’s suggested strategies can be applied to a wide range of educational experiences in the first college year and beyond.

Other volumes in the series:
Volume I: Designing and Administering the Course
Volume II: Instructor Training and Development
Volume III: Teaching in the First-Year Seminar
Volume IV: Using Peers in the Classroom

These are also available as a Five Volume Set

Paper: 978 1 889271 81 1 / $25.00
Designing and Administering the Course
The volume opens by defining common seminar configurations, goals, and course topics, drawing on national studies and institutional research reports. It also offers guidance in selecting a seminar model. The authors also address strategies for launching and administering the seminar and successfully managing change within the course. Broadly conceived, this first volume in the five-volume series lays the ground work for more in-depth coverage to follow.

Other volumes in the series:
Volume II: Instructor Training and Development
Volume III: Teaching in the First-Year Seminar
Volume IV: Using Peers in the Classroom
Volume V: Assessing the First-Year Seminar

These are also available as a Five Volume Set

Paper: 978 1 889271 75 0 / $25.00
Instructor Training and Development
Guided by an understanding of adult development, the authors suggest strategies for designing and presenting a comprehensive faculty development program in support of the first-year seminar. Chapters focus on the organization of one-shot and ongoing development efforts, content for training programs, evaluation as a development activity, and strategies for recruiting and maintaining a dedicated instructor team. While focused on the first-year seminar, the volume offers useful insight for anyone charged with designing faculty development initiatives for first-year instructors.

Other volumes in the series:
Volume I: Designing and Administering the Course
Volume III: Teaching in the First-Year Seminar
Volume IV: Using Peers in the Classroom
Volume V: Assessing the First-Year Seminar

These are also available as a Five Volume Set

Paper: 978 1 889271 76 7 / $25.00
Teaching in the First-Year Seminar
Building on the conversation begun in Volume II on instructor training and development, Garner delves deeper into the concepts and strategies undergirding effective educational practice. Highly practical in nature, yet grounded in educational theory and research, Volume III offers a concise guide to teaching in the first-year seminar from organizing a syllabus, structuring individual class sessions, and engaging students in the classroom to conducting meaningful assessments of their learning. Because Garner focuses on the learning process rather than specific content, the strategies are highly portable to a range of seminar types and undergraduate courses. An invaluable resource for college instructors looking to improve their own teaching.

Other volumes in the series:
Volume I: Designing and Administering the Course
Volume II: Instructor Training and Development
Volume IV: Using Peers in the Classroom
Volume V: Assessing the First-Year Seminar

These are also available as a Five Volume Set

Paper: 978 1 889271 77 4 / $25.00
Using Peers in the Classroom
In an effort to capitalize on some of the more positive aspects of peer influences, colleges and universities have created a wide range of peer-to-peer education, leadership, and mentoring roles—especially in the first college year. Yet, the use of peers in first-year seminar instruction is still far from commonplace. Latino and Ashcraft offer guidance on defining the role of peers as co-instructors; recruiting, selecting, and training peer educators; facilitating relationship building within the instructional team; and assessing the impact of peer leaders on the course, the students served, and the peers themselves. Sample training agendas and activities, course syllabi, and evaluations are included.

Other volumes in the series:
Volume I: Designing and Administering the Course
Volume II: Instructor Training and Development
Volume III: Teaching in the First-Year Seminar
Volume V: Assessing the First-Year Seminar

These are also available as a Five Volume Set

Paper: 978 1 889271 79 8 / $25.00