BOOKS FOR TEACHERS, ADMINISTRATORS, AND POLICYMAKERS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Power to the Polls

A Guide to Developing Civic Learning, Election Engagement, and Political Action in Higher Education

Edited by Marianne Magjuka
Foreword by Caryn McTighe Musil
Paperback
November 2022
9781642674057
More details
  • Publisher
    Stylus Publishing
  • ISBN 9781642674057
  • Language English
  • Pages 267 pp.
  • Size 6" x 9"
$37.50
Hardback
November 2022
9781642674040
More details
  • Publisher
    Stylus Publishing
  • ISBN 9781642674040
  • Language English
  • Pages 267 pp.
  • Size 6" x 9"
$135.00
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November 2022
9781642674064
More details
  • Publisher
    Stylus Publishing
  • ISBN 9781642674064
  • Language English
  • Pages 267 pp.
  • Size 6" x 9"
$135.00
E-Book (ePub)
November 2022
9781642674071
More details
  • Publisher
    Stylus Publishing
  • ISBN 9781642674071
  • Language English
  • Pages 267 pp.
  • Size 6" x 9"
$37.50

Given that students are increasingly arriving on campus with limited civic knowledge, and the fragile state of our democracy, there is an urgent need to incorporate civic learning into courses, programs, systems, and processes throughout our institutions.

This book provides administrators, student affairs educators, and faculty with frameworks and examples for developing initiatives and programs to promote students’ civic learning and democratic engagement; set sustainable, campus-wide goals; track student learning outcomes; and make data-driven decisions that impact the campus climate for civic engagement.

For many campuses, the first step is to assemble a diverse team of faculty, staff, students, and community partners to review existing programs; research national organizations that offer data, support, and benchmarks for sustainable initiatives; identify examples of practice such as those described in this book; and consider the diversity of the student body and local community, their needs, and the opportunities they offer.

Beyond two opening chapters that provide foundational grounding for this work, this volume offers nineteen emerging and promising examples of how a range of institutions—from community colleges and liberal arts universities to state and Research One institutions—are addressing the need for civic learning, promoting civil political discourse, engaging students in voter registration and mobilization, and on how to work with legislators on issues—and how to promote his work on a non-partisan basis.

The chapters identify a wide range of resources and organizations that support the work of civic engagement both nationally—such as AAC&U, Campus Compact, NASPA, Institute for Democracy & Higher Education, the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement, and the Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning and Engagement—and at the state level.

When designed and executed well, civic learning programs can foster competencies for lifelong citizenship and inspire young people to see themselves as civic actors and problem-solvers, to seek diverse viewpoints and perspectives, and to make change in their communities. This book offers ideas, resources, and frameworks to undertake this vital task.

"This book is a must-read for those who are invested in higher education’s role in preparing students to be informed, engaged participants in our democracy. It asks us all to consider the ways in which colleges and universities and the organizations supporting these institutions can ensure that students are equipped with the knowledge, skills, and experiences necessary to develop their own political agency in a world in need of their ideas and leadership."

Jennifer Domagal-Goldman, Executive Director, ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge

Foreword
List of Tables
List of Figures
Acknowledgements

Introduction
Chapter 1: Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement: Pillars of an Evolving Field—Marianne Magjuka

Chapter 2: Foundations of Institutionalizing Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement—Stephanie King and Marianne Magjuka

Part I: Civic Learning
Chapter 3: Citizen U: Engage, Educate, Inspire—Alex R. Dennis

Chapter 4: The Iowa Caucus Project: Collaborative Project-Based Experiential Learning in Practice—Rachel Paine Caufield

Chapter 5: Democracy on My Mind—Ryan Keesee and Semline Delva

Chapter 6: Critical Democratic Literacy—Sandra Rodriguez, Amy Koeckes, and Jennifer Lowman

Part II: Dialogue and Political Discourse
Chapter 7: The Active Citizen Series: A Model for Advancing Student Civic Discourse—Bob Frigo and Carrie Eaves

Chapter 8: Let’s Get Political: Civic Literacy that Promotes Civic Action—Melissa Gruver and Viviana Tsangaropoulos

Chapter 9: Using Art and Design to Create a Culture of Global Citizenship—Abby Neyenhouse, Allison Fisher, Hannah Shaw, and Kate McGrain

Part III: Get Out the Vote (GOTV)
Chapter 10: Get Out the Vote (GOTV) and Higher Education: Student Political Engagement at Saint Louis University—Leah Sweetman and Sabrina Tyuse

Chapter 11: Mitigating Election Anxiety—Christine Beluk and Jason Hollander

Chapter 12: The Struggle Continues: Civic Deserts, Ballot Access, and Challenges to College Student Voting—Marianne Magjuka

Part IV: Civic Action
Chapter 13: Engaging Students in Civic Action: The Rollins Democracy Project—Bailey Clark

Chapter 14: Summer of Civic Action: Empowering Students as Agents of Democratic Access and Inclusion—Elizabeth Vann and Danika Brown

Chapter 15: Engaging College Students in the Election Process: The Alverno College Poll Worker Project—Susan Leister

Chapter 16: Empowering Women for Public Leadership: NEW Leadership® Pennsylvania Summer Institute—Dana Brown

Part V: Institutional Sustainability
Chapter 17: Fostering Voting Engagement Across All Disciplines: The Role of Faculty—John Frazier, MaryGrace Longoria, and Joshua Young

Chapter 18: Shaping Civic Leaders: Student Leadership Development for Sustainable Democratic Engagement—Marianne Magjuka and Deb Marke

Chapter 19: Salt Lake City Community College Civic Literacy Student Learning Outcome Efforts—Lucy Smith and Emily Putnam

Epilogue—Future Directions in Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement


About the Contributors
Index

Marianne Magjuka

Marianne Magjuka serves as Assistant Dean of Students and Executive Director of the Office of Civic & Community Engagement at Wake Forest University. In this role, Marianne provides strategic vision and oversight for community-based engagement, including service and leadership programs, social justice education, community-based teaching and research, and community partnerships. She established the civic learning and democratic engagement initiative at Wake Forest and created Deacs Decide, a campus-wide election engagement project. In 2015, Marianne established the Winston-Salem Community Action Coalition, an AmeriCorps*VISTA project focused on education, food security and public health, and economic development. She is the co-founder of the Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement Knowledge Community in NASPA. Marianne received a B.A. in History and M.Ed. from the University of Notre Dame and an Ed.D. in Higher Education Management from the University of Pennsylvania.