BOOKS FOR TEACHERS, ADMINISTRATORS, AND POLICYMAKERS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

What Inclusive Instructors Do

Principles and Practices for Excellence in College Teaching

Paperback
May 2021
9781642671933
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  • Publisher
    Stylus Publishing
  • ISBN 9781642671933
  • Language English
  • Pages 240 pp.
  • Size 6" x 9"
  • Images 1 fig
$29.95
Lib E-Book

Library E-Books

We have signed up with three aggregators who resell networkable e-book editions of our titles to academic libraries. These aggregators offer a variety of plans to libraries, such as simultaneous access by multiple library patrons, and access to portions of titles at a fraction of list price under what is commonly referred to as a “patron-driven demand” model.

These editions, priced at par with simultaneous hardcover editions of our titles, are not available direct from Stylus, but only from the following aggregators:

  • Ebook Library, a service of Ebooks Corporation Ltd. of Australia
  • ebrary, based in Palo Alto, a subsidiary of ProQuest
  • EBSCO / netLibrary, Alabama

as well as through the following wholesalers: The Yankee Book Peddler subsidiary of Baker & Taylor, Inc.

May 2021
9781642671940
More details
  • Publisher
    Stylus Publishing
  • ISBN 9781642671940
  • Language English
  • Pages 240 pp.
  • Size 6" x 9"
  • Images 1 fig
$125.00
Hardback
May 2021
9781642671926
More details
  • Publisher
    Stylus Publishing
  • ISBN 9781642671926
  • Language English
  • Pages 240 pp.
  • Size 6" x 9"
  • Images 1 fig
$125.00
E-Book (ePub)
May 2021
9781642671957
More details
  • Publisher
    Stylus Publishing
  • ISBN 9781642671957
  • Language English
  • Pages 240 pp.
  • Size 6" x 9"
  • Images 1 fig
$29.95

Inclusive instruction is teaching that recognizes and affirms a student's social identity as an important influence on teaching and learning processes, and that works to create an environment in which students are able to learn from the course, their peers, and the teacher while still being their authentic selves. It works to disrupt traditional notions of who succeeds in the classroom and the systemic inequities inherent in traditional educational practices.—
Full-time Academic Professional, Doctorate-granting University, Education

This book uniquely offers the distilled wisdom of scores of instructors across ranks, disciplines and institution types, whose contributions are organized into a thematic framework that progressively introduces the reader to the key dispositions, principles and practices for creating the inclusive classroom environments (in person and online) that will help their students succeed.

The authors asked the hundreds of instructors whom they surveyed as part of a national study to define what inclusive teaching meant to them and what inclusive teaching approaches they implemented in their courses.

The instructors’ voices ring loudly as the authors draw on their responses, building on their experiences and expertise to frame the conversation about what inclusive teachers do. The authors in addition describe their own insights and practices, integrating and discussing current literature relevant to inclusive teaching to ensure a research-supported approach.

Inclusive teaching is no longer an option but a vital teaching competency as our classrooms fill with racially diverse, first generation, and low income and working class students who need a sense of belonging and recognition to thrive and contribute to the construction of knowledge.

The book unfolds as an informal journey that allows the reader to see into other teachers’ practices. With questions for reflection embedded throughout the book, the authors provide the reader with an inviting and thoughtful guide to develop their own inclusive teaching practices.

By utilizing the concepts and principles in this book readers will be able to take steps to transform their courses into spaces that are equitable and welcoming, and adopt practical strategies to address the various inclusion issues that can arise.

The book will also appeal to educational developers and staff who support instructors in their inclusive teaching efforts. It should find a place in reflective workshops, book clubs and learning communities exploring this important topic.

"The authors have created an essential resource for college instructors by bridging the gap between theory and practice. Their practical, adaptable guidance is informed by a national faculty survey and integrated with evidence from the educational literature. The book addresses why inclusive teaching matters and goes beyond classroom practices to consider inclusive institutional culture. Instructors and administrators at all types of institutions will benefit from this timely approach to a critical topic."

Jennifer Frederick, PhD, Executive Director of the Poorvu Center for Teaching and Learning, Yale University

"This book is a timely and extraordinarily comprehensive resource for supporting instructors who wish to engage with inclusive teaching. Every facet of what makes teaching inclusive is unpacked and brought to life with quotes and examples from real instructors across different disciplines and institutional contexts, and the reflection questions embedded within each section create a natural way for instructors to engage more deeply with the text and think about applications in their own teaching. No stone is left unturned in connecting the practices shared and the research on why and how those practices support inclusion, making this a most valuable resource for instructors at any stage in their teaching careers."

Catherine Ross, PhD, Executive Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Columbia University

“This book is an invaluable resource for anyone aiming to engage in the ‘ongoing process’ of what inclusive instructors do. The range of faculty voices that appear throughout the book provide inspiration and confirmation – this is something faculty do across the disciplines and in many teaching contexts. The concrete advice and reflective questions have helped us – and, we are confident, will help you – to be more inclusive and intentional in teaching.

We take four core lessons from this book. What do inclusive instructors do?

  1. They take responsibility for making their teaching and their curriculum inclusive.
  2. They continue to learn about both their students and teaching.
  3. They care about and for each and every student they teach.
  4. They change their teaching based on evidence about the practices that support and challenge all students to thrive.

Those may seem simple, but the work of inclusive instructors is seldom easy. Take a deep breath. It’s time to get to work.”

Buffie Longmire-Avital and Peter Felten, Elon University

Foreword — Buffie Longmire-Avital and Peter Felten

Preface

Acknowledgments

Part One: Evidence Supporting Inclusion and Major Principles

1) The What and Why of Inclusive Teaching
2) What Do They Know About Being Inclusive?

Part Two: The Practice of Inclusive Teaching
3) How Do They Design an Inclusive Course?
4) How Do They Make Students Feel Welcome?
5) How Do They Conduct Class Inclusively?

Part Three: Developing and Sustaining a Culture of Inclusive Teaching
6) Using a Tool to Support Inclusive Teaching
7) Concluding Thoughts

Epilogue: Developing and Sustaining a Culture of Inclusive Teaching
Appendix A: Study Methodology
Appendix B: List of Chapter Reflection Questions
Appendix C: Welcome Statement Example
Appendix D: Syllabus Quiz Example
Appendix E: Stereotype Content Model-Driven Reestablishment of a Welcoming Classroom Worksheet
About the Authors
References
Index

Tracie Marcella Addy

Tracie Marcella Addy is Associate Dean of Teaching and Learning at Lafayette College.  Dr. Addy directs the Center for the Integration of Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship and serves in other leadership capacities. She enjoys working with instructors across all divisions and ranks to develop and administer programming related to the teacher-scholar model, from classroom teaching to the scholarship of teaching and learning. She has experience teaching at a diverse array of institution types. In addition to her leadership roles she performs scholarship on learner-centered practices including active learning and inclusive teaching. Dr. Addy also publishes educational materials and serves as an associate editor for various journals.

Derek Dube

Derek Dube is Associate Professor of Biology at the University of Saint Joseph (CT). As a faculty member in the Department of Biology, who has taught both in-person and online in undergraduate and graduate settings, to both Biology majors and non-majors alike, Dr. Dube has had the opportunity to work with students from broad demographic, socioeconomic, and educational backgrounds in the classroom, as research mentees, and in his role as Director for the Center for Student Research and Creative Activity. In addition to his research in the field of biology, Dr. Dube spends significant time developing and publishing educational materials and research studies around best-practices in teaching.

Khadijah A. Mitchell

Khadijah A. Mitchell, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Biology and Peter C.S. d'Aubermont, M.D. Scholar of Health and Life Sciences at Lafayette College. As a teacher scholar, Dr. Mitchell advocates for education and health equity. She has taught undergraduate and graduate STEM and public health courses at a range of institutions, from selective liberal arts colleges to doctoral research universities. She integrates research findings from her laboratory into each class, and take ideas generated in the classroom back to the laboratory. Her teaching scholarship centers on creating spaces for students from all backgrounds to participate in the biomedical enterprise. Dr. Mitchell’s award-winning research and leadership in governmental service addresses the causes and consequences of cancer and COVID-19 health disparities in underrepresented populations.

Mallory SoRelle

Mallory SoRelle is an Assistant Professor of public policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. Her research and teaching interests explore how public policies influence intersectional forms of socioeconomic and political inequality in the United States. She has experience teaching undergraduate and graduate students across a variety of educational settings including doctoral granting institutions, a liberal arts college, and a degree-granting prison education program. Dr. SoRelle holds a PhD in American Politics from Cornell University, a Master of Public Policy from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, and a BA with honors from Smith College.

Inclusive classroom; student support; teaching and learning; inclusive teaching; diversity; equity; inclusive course design