BOOKS FOR TEACHERS, ADMINISTRATORS, AND POLICYMAKERS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Effective Practices for Academic Leaders Archive Series

Effective Practices for Academic Leaders

Departmental Effectiveness

Paperback
December 2006
9781579221614
More details
  • Publisher
    Stylus Publishing
  • Published
    1st December 2006
  • ISBN 9781579221614
  • Language English
  • Pages 16 pp.
  • Size 8.5" x 11"
$20.00
Lib E-Book

Library E-Books

We have signed up with three aggregators who resell networkable e-book editions of our titles to academic libraries. These aggregators offer a variety of plans to libraries, such as simultaneous access by multiple library patrons, and access to portions of titles at a fraction of list price under what is commonly referred to as a “patron-driven demand” model.

These editions, priced at par with simultaneous hardcover editions of our titles, are not available direct from Stylus, but only from the following aggregators:

  • Ebook Library, a service of Ebooks Corporation Ltd. of Australia
  • ebrary, based in Palo Alto, a subsidiary of ProQuest
  • EBSCO / netLibrary, Alabama

as well as through the following wholesalers: The Yankee Book Peddler subsidiary of Baker & Taylor, Inc.

December 2006
9781579223908
More details
  • Publisher
    Stylus Publishing
  • Published
    15th December 2006
  • ISBN 9781579223908
  • Language English
  • Pages 16 pp.
  • Size 8.5" x 11"
$10.00

Executive Summary
This briefing explores one of the most common leadership roles in academe— that of a department chair. It draws distinctions between the skills and knowledge necessary for successful management of an individual career and those required for farsighted departmental leadership, which calls for a holistic, organizational-level view of a program or a department as part of the larger institution. The briefing describes an in-depth approach to planning, assessment, and improvement in academic departments, using as a model the Malcolm Baldrige Program of the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

This model was adapted to the needs of higher-education institutions,
with their particular emphases on scholarship, research, service, outreach, and teaching and instruction. The resulting Excellence in Higher Education (EHE) model, first developed at Rutgers University in 1994 and now in its seventh version (Ruben, 2007a), provides an integrated approach to assessment, planning, and improvement, drawing on the Baldrige model, as well as on standards and language of the institutional accrediting associations.

The following seven categories of the EHE are seen as interrelated parts of a unified system: (1) leadership, (2) strategic planning, (3) beneficiaries and constituencies, (4) programs and services, (5) faculty/staff and workplace, (6) assessment and information use, and (7) outcomes and achievements. The briefing elaborates on the application of the EHE framework by focusing on its categories as well as the EHE process and several ways that it can be used. The impact of the model is shown through results of two studies conducted to assess the practical value of EHE to participants. The briefing then discusses the framework outcomes in terms of specific improvement initiatives adopted by departments that have used EHE as well as lessons learned from more than 50 EHE assessments nationwide. Finally, the briefing highlights the contributions of EHE to fostering successful leadership practices and ultimately advancing the mission of a department, a program, and the larger institution.

Brent D. Ruben

Brent D. Ruben is a distinguished professor, and executive director of the Center for Organizational Development and Leadership at Rutgers University. He is also a member of the faculties of the Rutgers Ph.D. Program in Higher Education and the Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine. Brent’s academic interests include human communication, organizational leadership, planning, assessment, and change.

He is author of numerous publications including Excellence in Higher Education Guide, What Leaders Need to Know and Do, and Communication and Human Behavior (with L. Stewart). Brent was a founder of the Rutgers School of Communication and Information, and served as a department chair and graduate program director. He is Rutgers liaison to the CIC leadership programs and he serves as an adviser to colleges and universities nationally and internationally.

Ruben was recently named Inaugural Winner of Baldrige Foundation Award for Leadership Excellence, for his development of the Excellence in Higher Education assessment and planning framework. Named after U.S. secretary of commerce Malcolm Baldrige, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award program was established by the U.S. Congress in 1987 to promote U.S. corporate effectiveness. The model provides an organizational assessment process that combines scholarly concepts of organizational theory and behavior with successful organizational and leadership practices. Read the press release here.